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Center benefits UAMS, helping secure $100M in research funding

UAMS says its Center for Translational Neuroscience (CTN), which was created to help UAMS grow its research enterprise, has benefited it in several ways. (KATV photo)

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences credits a nationally funded research center for helping the institution receive more than $100 million in competitive grants over 13 years.

UAMS says its Center for Translational Neuroscience (CTN), which was created to help UAMS grow its research enterprise, has benefited it in several ways.

“Over the years, the CTN has helped support a number of researchers at UAMS capable of overseeing large-scale research programs funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and others,” said Lawrence Cornett, Ph.D., UAMS vice chancellor for research. “It has also helped us acquire and maintain the core research equipment and facilities necessary for the highest caliber science anywhere.”

The center was funded by the first Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) award and funding has come in three phases, with the center now in its final phase of funding focused on helping UAMS compete for large-scale research programs.

The center has provided targeted funding to help researchers earn three major awards, including two new COBREs: IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trial Network (ISPCTN) Data Coordinating and Operations Center, the Center for Translational Pediatric Research and the Center for Studies of Host Response to Cancer Therapy.

UAMS credits the center's early success to researchers who received funding support and to the CTN external advisory committee that identified them.

It also says CTN has helped in reducing Arkansas' infant mortality rate. The center's COBRE-supported telemedicine program, Pediatric Physician Learning and Collaborative Education (Peds PLACE), connects UAMS neonatologists with physicians who are caring for newborns in Arkansas hospital nurseries. Peds PLACE success will now allow the program to expand its reach into Oklahoma.

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