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'Boys on the Tracks' documents still not released to attorney

An attorney suing the government for documents related to the ‘Boys on the Tracks’ deaths tells KATV he has yet to receive those files.

An attorney suing the government for documents related to the "Boys on the Tracks" deaths tells KATV he has yet to receive those files.

Earlier this week, a judge ruled that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration had until Friday to produce suggested redactions to the court.

Little Rock attorney Davis Lewis represents the mother of one of the boys found dead on the tracks. He believes the two teens were murdered after witnessing a drug drop and that the CIA covered up what happened.

It's been more than three decades since Kevin Ives and Don Henry were found dead on train tracks in Alexander. Rumors and conspiracy theories have swirled since 1987, but Lewis is determined to find out the truth.

"People should care whether the government is corrupt or not. People should care whether the government is smuggling drugs or not. People should care whether the government is killing children or not,” said Lewis.

Lewis represents Linda Ives. Since her son was found dead, she has questioned the state's findings.

“That was a drug drop for Barry Seal," Lewis claims, "and the boys either suspected it or knew it, or just happened upon on [it] at the wrong time, and were killed by police officers."

Currently at stake are documents Lewis has requested from the Department of Homeland Security and the DEA.

"The truth is out there somewhere," Lewis said. "There's a lot of people that know the truth, they're just not talking. They're not revealing anything."

When asked why he believes people aren't revealing the truth, Lewis said: "They're protecting people. Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, Oliver North -- people like that who are involved in the gun-running, drug-running.”

By Friday’s deadline, Lewis said he had not yet received the redacted documents, but he has file a motion asking a judge to reconsider other requests made to about a dozen state and federal agencies.

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